trouble thinking im going to get taken serious!

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DAS19

Guest
Well I am 16 almost 17 and I am in the process of writing a script that I really want to direct. I plan on renting a DVX100a and filming it. I just feel like actors and other people wont take me seriously when I want to have auditions and stuff like that only being in highschool and stuff. I am very serious about all of it and I want to put in my own money to do this even thoiught I made it very low budget that all I will need is the camera and the lights. What do you suggest me doing? Alot of it is me thinking i am not gonna get taken seriously nothing has happened yet.

Any help will be appreciated.

Dave.
 

Kim Welch

Senior Member
Staff member
my 2 cents - stay focused

my 2 cents - stay focused

my 2 cents - stay focused
first things first. take it one step at a time.

also, take this suggestion, you are going to do well and you will love what you are doing. and, you will learn more about filmmaking.

tell people you are serious if you feel the need to let them in on it for any reason.

also, if it is as low budget as I imagine, make sure you feed your crew and talent. possibly make a deal with subway and your local pizza place ahead of time.

Kim
 
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DAS19

Guest
haha its so funny you mention that becuase everywhere they mention such a thing that probabvly would get looked past if everyone didnt. Thanks for the advice kim. I am looking at a budget around 300-500 dollars for a short.

I have about 7 pages written already with tweaking still needed to be done.

But I will for sure find a local place that will discount catering for credit or something like that. Theres a family owned place that one of my friends parents owns that everyone knows them becuase they live in the town and im sure they would give me a discounted rate to cater my set.

Thanks for the advice again.
David S.
 

JimT

New member
Reply to Dave

Reply to Dave

Hi Dave,

Don't worry about your age or that this is your first project. The people you end up working with will probably be in similar circumstances.

As far as respect, the way you get that is by respecting others. Be appreciative of the contributions of others. Listen to their comments and be sensitive to their needs. Above all, be professional: be organized, stay calm, and lead by example instead of bossing others around.

The fact that you are concerned about how others perceive you is a good first step. Always remember that film and video are collaborative processes and teamwork and cooperation are essential.

Best of luck with your project.

JimT
 
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DAS19

Guest
One of my leads is a man around 60 years old. God I hope I can find one.
 

JimT

New member
Reply to Dave

Reply to Dave

For actors in low budget projects, I have always had good luck with community theater groups. And they are a great source for older actors.
JimT
 
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DAS19

Guest
Thanks I have a nice local theatre 2 towns away ill lookm into it.
 
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Aidyn

Guest
I had a similar problem. I wrote a script and my friends enjoyed it but when it came to auditioning (i had a good turn out) people suddenly lst interest and the project floppped. Since then i learned that you need to take things slow and its good to break it up into steps. Also make a schedule so everyone knows what to expect. Sometimes i also found that if you do alot of the preliminary stuff by yourself the rest of the crew will take notice and realise that it is indeed serious.
 
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DAS19

Guest
I think I am going to not have a specific day to tryout I think they can just call me for a privite audition.
 
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markcheng

Guest
My suggestion Das, is to try and hold a formal audition. People will think that you are more serious this way than asking interested actors to call you. It will also save you a lot of time and possibly money if you schedule all the auditions at once.

I'm about to begin production on my film now and when I did auditions, I didn't want to have to deal with a gazillion actors showing up at the studio. Instead I carefully reviewed the resumes/headshots I got and invited 5-10 actors for each character. Of those 5-10, I had a turnout of 1-5. (this is for a non-paying project keep in mind). With that level of turnout I was able to spend 10-15 minutes with each actor to see how they perform and how they take direction.

Plan it out, schedule, and organize. Everyone will respect you and take the project as serious as you do. good luck! and post here about how it goes!

mark
 
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Aidyn

Guest
This sucks, i was working on shooting a film this winter but i just found out recently my friends who were going to help cannot do it. I suggest you get people that you can communicate often too, live nearby you, and arent in high school.

(thats my rant for today)
 
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EyeFull

Guest
working for free

working for free

Almost everybody needs a sample of their work. Your objective is to complete a project so that everyone who works on it will want to use it as a sample of their capabilities. That's the payoff....they help you...and you give them a demo of their work. Most likely they will try their best because it won't be just your project it will be theirs as well. This is true for techs and talent.
 

Lazlo

New member
I am 18 in high school, and can tell you from personal experience, that auditions are pretty impractical at that level unless you plan to pay your actors and actresses. The trouble comes because its difficult to make people you don't know care about a project you care about. My recommendation is to get to know people in the drama department, or plays, seek out good actors and actresses at your school, and ask them personally. They're usually flattered, and join the project instantly. You may not have ultimate control over casting, but make sure you do maintain control over what you can, such as scheduling and shotlist-the details are important. Also, if this is your first film, think small... One of my friends wanted to shoot a 20 minute script with over 10 actors, and it just fell apart... There are great films that can be made with just two people. Be creative.
 
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markcheng

Guest
i guess my personal experience is a bit different from Lazlo's, but I agree with his points about small sized casts and befriending the theater people. I think it's still an important guideline that people will only take your project as serious as you do, so if you're disorganized and miss your own appointments, then the cast and crew will take note. Alternatively, if you were to hold formal auditions and schedule everything out, people will take notice and might follow suit. mark.
 
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violettak

Guest
Dave,

Do you have friends or family that are interested in your project?

It may be more practical for you starting out to write with elements that are available to you.

I know it's hard to find people that will be half as passionate about your projects as you are, especially when it's no/low budget and you are first starting out, so it's definitely not going to be easy. But, hang in there. It's worth the hard work.
 

tagliare

New member
I've found that a good way to convince people that you're serious about filmmaking is to show enthusiasm for your film. Don't just tell your crew what to do, tell them why they should do it. Convince them that this film is worth making. If you're not commited, why should they be? Really care for your film like it's your baby.

With that in mind, if you have to beg someone who is very reluctent to join your film, don't hire them. Without money to entice them, the only thing that will bring your cast and crew on set is commitment. Without enthusiasm for your film, there is a slim chance that they will want to go out of their way for you.

And don't be boring either, no one likes to spend their friday nights with a grouch.

If you show passion for your film, your cast and crew will do the same.
 
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