No particular subject...

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Digigenic

Guest
I'm new here, so it's probably a little premature for me to direct an observation towards this forum, but it appears to be a little ironic how nobody likes to write in the screenwriter's forum...probably out of fear that if they did, there would be more attention drawn towards the style and structure of their posting than the actual question and/or suggestion within their posting? I don't know, I'm just bored, I'm gonna go to bed now...feel free to deconstruct my post...
 
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negitivecreep

Guest
just a reply

just a reply

i am a beginner here to and i am not tring to decstruct your post and no offence but i dont think that if someone wanted to ask a question that they would write it in the way they would write for a projecting there are working on. I dont know why they are not posting but i do think that it has little to do with fear i love writing for film i will talk about
 
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Digigenic

Guest
No offense taken.

But first, let me clarify something...I'm also a beginner, and I thought that my comments would have had an ironic twist of appeal, maybe even been considered humorous, but you've discredited that theory with reasons that aren't so clear. I had a little difficulty trying to interpret what you meant to say, but I'll try to justify a response anyway...

I do know one of the REAL reasons for no postings, because it's a new forum, and there were very few registered users when I made the first post. My intent was to "break the ice" or to simply "get a rise"...and it worked...8 days later you responded.

So, what exactly is your preference or style of writing? Do you use any particular screenwriting applications? Do you recommend any particular books on the subject?
 
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Digigenic

Guest
Sorry for responding twice, the first one was sent in before I registered.
 

violet

New member
Digigenic said:
No offense taken.

But first, let me clarify something...I'm also a beginner, and I thought that my comments would have had an ironic twist of appeal, maybe even been considered humorous, but you've discredited that theory with reasons that aren't so clear. I had a little difficulty trying to interpret what you meant to say, but I'll try to justify a response anyway...

I do know one of the REAL reasons for no postings, because it's a new forum, and there were very few registered users when I made the first post. My intent was to "break the ice" or to simply "get a rise"...and it worked...8 days later you responded.

So, what exactly is your preference or style of writing? Do you use any particular screenwriting applications? Do you recommend any particular books on the subject?
hello! i'm new here too, but i'm not a screenwriter. i'm a writer (novice), casually surfing the net today, searching writers markets and different types of jobs in the writing field.

what kind of screenwriting applications are you referring to? i'm not up to date with this kind of stuff, but isn't there screenwriting software out there that does the brainstorming for you? isn't that cheating?

when can one technically call himself or herself a screenwriter, anyway?
 
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Digigenic

Guest
Hey Violet,

When I said "applications", I was referring to software applications, like Final Draft, which is a brilliantly developed application that I recently acquired for use on my screenplays. I should emphasize that a software application is intended to make the job of screenwriting easier by making sure that one doesn't make structure mistakes, but it isn't going to think of ideas for me. I don't want that, and I don't need that. Final Draft simply allows me to focus more on the fluidity of my ideas within the writing, while it focuses on the structure and uniformity of it as I go, because when one's imagination is unraveling, they don't have time to stop and think about structure.

Other apps, like Moviemagic screenwriting software has a good reputation too. Essentially, all of these apps act like super advanced plug-ins for Microsoft word, making sure that your work remains properly formatted for screen, stage, television, etc. So I wouldn't call a user of these applications "cheaters", but if you still insist, then you'll be calling a hell of a lot of people in the entertainment industry cheaters.

As for your departing question on the legitimacy of technically labeling oneself a "screenwriter", I have to say, that if you've already, are currently, or are going to write and/or type something for artistic translation to a visual medium of some sort, then you can consider yourself a screenwriter. Although, I ‘m sure that you’ll get a much more philosophically pleasing answer to that question from someone like Robert McKee or Syd Field.

I Hope that alleviates your concerns…
 

violet

New member
Hey Digigenic!

Thanks so much for your reply! However, I don't insist on calling anyone a "cheater." I asked you what applications you were referring to -- I was not saying you were talking about brainstorming or choose-the-next-scene-sequence-sequel software in particular. My intent was also to "break the ice" or to simply get some responses from other readers on what they think about such software. I haven't tried this kind of brainstorming or story-help software. I've only read articles and reviews about them and also read that people in the entertainment industry use them, but let me be clear -- I'm not calling them cheaters either. I'm simply asking if it's cheating but wouldn't really know unless I tried the software myself. Like some so-called programming and database-made-easy software programs, you still need to know how to program in order to take full advantage of the software. So with this brainstorming software, I doubt a person who doesn't even know the basics of storytelling or writing would be able to produce a saleable product in the end, but who knows?

The software that you were referring sounds pretty interesting. It's not hard for me to format a script or screenplay, but I might check out that software out anyway. Sounds cool.

__________________
let there be peace

 
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Cruz

Guest
Um... Hello? Yeah...um...let me try my hand at this "breaking the ice" stuff...um... Is it a little stuffy in here? :twisted:
 

MarkG

New member
Yeah, I use 'Final Draft' too: I used to write text files and then load them into Word at work in the evenings to reformat them into proper script format, but it was a real pain in the butt. Final Draft cost more, but it eliminated one of the biggest excuses I had not to write :).
 
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aPerfectCircle

Guest
yeah, final draft is awesome, it helps out quite a bit, I like the scene navigator feature where you can jump to new scenes and stuff, I hardly wrote before because writing in an application like microsoft word was difficult to get the format straight and stuff, but final draft is fast and easy. Just this last month I've written 3 short screenplays, about 20 pages each. great software, I'd say worth the money.
 
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Digigenic

Guest
I went ahead and created a seperate topic devoted to FINAL DRAFT.
 
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DivaCatscratch

Guest
<----Very Newbie...

<----Very Newbie...

Although, I'm just a geekgirl (technical support chick!), I have a lot of topics and characters to write and talk about...

The thing is, I don't know how to bring them to life for other people to get to know...

Does anyone know where I should begin?

DC

P.S. Hi Jody!
 

MarkG

New member
It's kinda odd how no one is talking about WHAT they're working on?
Hmm... script-wise I'm developing two monster movies, an Ealing-style comedy, a supernatural western and a WW1 movie at the moment. Not sure whether any of them will ever go anywhere, but they all have some potential.

Does anyone know where I should begin?
There are a lot of books on the subject of scriptwriting, which cover the basics of traditional movie structure and how to go from an idea to a finished movie. Slavishly following them is probably bad, but I've generally found that the more I try to ignore them, the more I end up just having to go back and rewrite it into the traditional structure afterwards :).

At the simplest level you just need to get some interesting characters and take them through a story with a beginning, middle and end, with something at stake that the audience will care about. One problem that a lot of spec scripts I see have (and some of mine are guilty too) is that the writer likes the characters too much to do bad things to them, but you have to do bad things to them for the audience to really care... minor annoyances are generally not the stuff of a good film script.
 

jodymichelle

Senior Member
Staff member
Hi Kyle :D

DivaCatscratch said:
I have a lot of topics and characters to write and talk about...

The thing is, I don't know how to bring them to life for other people to get to know...

Does anyone know where I should begin?

DC

P.S. Hi Jody!
definitely get a book or two (or more) about screenwriting and read the scripts of your favorite movies, but don't get too stressed about how to write a script. just write. start with your characters since you said you have a lot of characters to write and talk about. write about your characters, and describe them until you can't describe them anymore. what are their wants, goals, issues, who are the people in their lives, what is going on during this time in their lives that you choose to write about them... etc... as for "how to bring them to life for other people to get to know..." i guess that means you would have to write a story :lol: bring them to life with the use of dialogue, actions, events, etc. ...you said you have a lot of topics to write and talk about, so that should help you with choosing your theme/plot/subplots. there's really no excuse for you to have writer's block yet or to not be able to fill a blank page. it's just a matter of making the time to actually sit and write down what is on your mind.

MarkG said:
One problem that a lot of spec scripts I see have (and some of mine are guilty too) is that the writer likes the characters too much to do bad things to them, but you have to do bad things to them for the audience to really care... minor annoyances are generally not the stuff of a good film script.
some things that i have seen... unnecessary dialogue that obviously only the writer wants to hear. also, dialogue that was obviously taken from a real conversation but wasn't modified to exactly fit the character or scene.
 
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