New Director on the Set

SpecialK

New member
Hey wuz up all. I am SpecialK. I have a question. I have worked n many film sets, but right now I am going to film my OWN short films this summer in Miami. This will be my FIRST movie that I directed. I will be seeing if any of the shorts will be accepted in any film festivals. Do you think this is a good way to get started as a young director? Or should I just work on more sets to get more experience from watching the professionals? Well I am just asking to get some feed back from the rest of the film community. I will be making about 3 short films in the next 3 months in Miami. Hit me up and let me know what you think.
 

Kim Welch

Senior Member
Staff member
How are your projects going?

How are your projects going?

Can you share anything about the statuf of your projects with us?


Kim
 

Aparna

New member
Directing etc

Directing etc

If you want to direct, then direct.

Of course, it's always a good idea to put in some time being AD and doing other jobs on set, but if you want to be director, the best way to learn about it is to direct your own film.

I'm a final-year film student in Cape Town, and the first year of school I spent doing everything else on set except directing because it seemed like such a big job. Eventually, about five months into my second year, I wrote, directed and produced my first short film and that experience taught me more about directing than the entire first year.

I think if you're spending three months shooting three movies, by the time you start shooting the third one, you'll have a pretty good idea of what's what and what not to do.

I hope it goes well.
 

MarkG

New member
Of course, it's always a good idea to put in some time being AD and doing other jobs on set,
To be honest, AD would be pretty low down my list of jobs that an aspiring director should do: any job on a movie is good experience, but editing, writing and lighting/camera are probably far more important. Professional ADs typically seem to progress on to producing rather than directing, since it's more of an organisational role than a creative one.
 

temerson

New member
I would have to disagree with the comment about not AD'ing a film. I've AD'd several films, some professionally, some volunteer. I'm also a writer-director-producer. Working as an AD, you learn what NOT to do on a film set. You won't see what's going well. You'll only see what's not going well. It will teach you more about what not to do, which is just as important as knowing what to do on a film set. It's the difference between being a director who spends all of their time with the actors and a director who says "Hey, Steve" to the Dolly Grip when he gets on set.
 

bollywood

New member
i agree with temerson..

i agree with temerson..

i agree with temerson, upto some extent... being an AD surely leans a bit towards being on a non-creative job... but at that time u r actually observing what the director is doing, how he manages the actors, their dialogues, etc etc...
again it all boils down to what kind of an AD u are.. some ADs are so lazy that they dont want to go one step up in their life, and actualy direct a film themselves, they dont learn the things they should, but rather take in the lethargy that should be avoided...its a matter of priorities again...if one really wants to make it big, he knows what to extract from the place he is working...
so, its not bad working as an AD, the trick is not to love the job to the extent that you just cant elevate yourself...learn, but dont get stuck in that....
and directing a film yourself is the most learning experience in the whole world... you go through so much just directing a 15 minuter, that u start respecting even the unprofessional film-maker who completes a one and a half hour film... but again, be cautious that you shouldnt fall in love with you 'baby'... people tend to fall in love with their films - and its very natral for that to happen - that they think that what they are doing is the pinnacle of glory...
anyways, happy filming!!! all the best!!
 

kingskid

New member
cold play said. if you'll never try you never knw. my principle for life has always being its better to try and fail than not to try at all. the truth is that you will always have that feeling of wanting to get more experience when ever you want to go of on your own, even if you work in 1000 sets. so take the challenge and do it with all your heart.
 

Tim Kolb

New member
Yes...there certainly isn't anything equal to actually doing the directing i suppose.

However...

There is a reason why so many trades have apprenticeship programs and why college grads don't start out in a company in the boardroom. Experiencing how others do something when they have years of experience themselves can allow you to learn what those who have traveled the road a bit know without having to make the mistakes necessary to learn yourself.

I think the general availability of means of production (inexpensive gear) has somehow clouded the fact that the methods of production are every bit the art and nuance that they always were, and established knowledge is still the best starting point for even the most innovative career to build on...

Reinventing the wheel feels like an adventure I'm sure, but after one goes through all that work, will it be any rounder?
 

director15

New member
Re: New Director on the Set

SpecialK said:
Hey wuz up all. I am SpecialK. I have a question. I have worked n many film sets, but right now I am going to film my OWN short films this summer in Miami. This will be my FIRST movie that I directed. I will be seeing if any of the shorts will be accepted in any film festivals. Do you think this is a good way to get started as a young director? Or should I just work on more sets to get more experience from watching the professionals? Well I am just asking to get some feed back from the rest of the film community. I will be making about 3 short films in the next 3 months in Miami. Hit me up and let me know what you think.
Just do it buddy. Ur doing exactly what I'm doing this summer. Go on the internet and got to google and type in "Ten Minute Film School" by director Robert Rodriguez. He says your learn more by picking up a camera making your own films your own mistakes and everything is subjective a mistake to someone is actually a piece of art to someone else hide behind that if someone says you made a mistake tell them its art.

Can't wait to see your films.

Sincerely,
Director15.
 
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