Indoor Outdoor matching

Kapil Raj

New member
I have to know about the exposure chosen while both indoor and outdoor is commited for filming.how much we can overexpose outdoor?can we keep the same light level as it is in outdoor?will it look natural?can we underexpose indoor by 1 stop or high by keeping the exposure of outdoor?
 
V

vervor

Guest
welllll

are you shooting film or video? This will decide a lot... In general outdoor light is "bluer" than indoor light and so you would normally shoot what is called tungsten film indoors and daylight film outdoors - then people will gell windows orangish to affect sunlight coming in or use an 85 filter or something on the camera if you have daylight and you're shooting indoors - - you just adjust everything with that in mind. But you cannot mix the two and expect "balanced"-looking color. As for video, there are often exposure presets to give you an idea of what each is commonly like with a certain white balance, but its often best to white balance once you've got your lights up so that your camera is adjusted to whatever color temp lighting you've got up. Now, you can fool white balancing by intentionally WBing on, say, a light blue card instead of a white one to go for a warmer look - this is often helpful with something that might be really blue or video-whitish like streaming light in the morning coming through the windows - if you WB this with a blueish tinted card then it will expose warmer. If you are shooting film, you shoot look yourself into details about what kind of film to pick up depending on what you're shooting. There are different decisions to be made depending on what sort of outdoor shooting you're doing and then what sort of lights/levels you'll be working with indoors. More details about what you're shooting with (film/video and camera) and where you're shooting will help pinpoint things so you are prepared completely.
 

Brad Hoover

New member
An 85 (orange) filter is used when you're shooting tungsten film outdoors in daylight. Not vice versa. It reduces the color temperature from approx. 5,600? k down to around 3,200? k. Tungsten film is balanced to see 3,200?k as white light. Without the 85 filter, daylight would read as blueish on tungsten film. Conversly, if you shoot daylight film (balanced to see 5,600?k as white light) insdoors with tungsten balanced movie lights, you will get a very orange cast to the film. There is a blue filter to compensate for this but it is rarely used because it knocks out over 2 stops of light. (The 85 has only a 2/3 stop light reduction).

Brad Hoover
 
V

vervor

Guest
ya - had it backwards...im less experienced with that type of adjustment
 

Kapil Raj

New member
Indoor Outdoor matching

my quiry is related to film and not for video.And my question isn't about the colour temperature but about the exposure.Thank u.[/code]
 
F

FilmUnited

Guest
It shouldn't matter if you are indoors or outdoors, the ability to handle under and overexposure is going to be determined mostly by your film stock.

Most modern stocks hold the detail just fine one to two stops underexposed and one to two stops over exposed. To answer your question accurately, I would need to know what stock you are shooting on.

Also, it depends on what you are underexposing and how you are doing it. For example, if a person is way underexposed but they are standing in front of a window, they will be silouetted and it will probably look OK. If someone is way underexposed standing in front of a black wall, it probably won't look OK.

In general, you should hope that your interior and your exterior are lit within 4 stops of each other and you can just split the difference.

If you can explain the situation more clearly I can try to give you better information.

Corey
 

Brad Hoover

New member
If you are doing a tracking shot that starts outdoors and moves indoors, (or vice versa) a trick I've used is to rack the iris very quickly when you pass a dark area at the transition between indoors and out. A door jam works well but it must be very dark and fill all or most of the frame as you pass it. The dark color masks the change in exposure. Of course you must also use dayligt balanced film and gel your interior lights with CTB to avoid a nasty color shift.
If an actor has to be in frame during whole shot, this trick might not work well. The exposure change from the iris rack will be noticable and might look odd. Do some tests.

-Brad Hoover
 
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