jodymichelle

Senior Member
Staff member
Over the past several weeks, DP Glen Kantziper has utilized the PX270 to shoot extensive green screen work for Hanesbrands (Maidenform, Champion); an interview for the U.S. Army's web series, "Starting Strong"; a segment for Al Jazeera America's investigative show, "The System"; and a workplace violence awareness video for Piedmont Natural Gas. Kantziper also used the PX270 to shoot what turned out to be one of the last interviews with the late poet/performer Maya Angelou, footage that will be used as part of a planned documentary about her life and work.

Read the newsbyte here:

http://www.hdproguide.com/north-car...-with-panasonics-new-aj-px270-p2-hd-handheld/


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Tim Kolb

New member
The selection of small form factor/small sensor cameras is pretty impressive these days.

Panasonic's tradeoff with this camera is that the ability to record an amazing array of formats (which helps a videographer/DP get hired as the diverse client roll call in the article indicates) comes at a price premium for a small sensor, small-frame HD camcorder purchase and the media necessary for "microP2" is also premium priced relative to even premium class SDXC type media.

If a videographer is going to make a living traveling and shooting corporate/broadcast work for hire, this camera has extraordinary specifications, particularly with the ability to shoot such a wide variety of "broadcast-approved" formats and it's travel-friendly form factor.

My travel/corporate camcorder remains the trusty Sony EX1, though the FDR-AX1 is starting to tempt me as the sensors are almost as large as the EX1, and as a 4K camcorder, is actually about the same price as the PX270 (or a bit less) though the internal formats are restricted to 50 Mbit/s XDcam422 for HD and 150 Mbit/s XAVC at UHD (~4K), and the Sony XQD media is priced similarly to microP2.

If you're a person who wants to do some expressive, creative "filmmaker" sort of projects (so few of us fit into one 'category' as it were), a larger sensor would help start to restrict the focal plane a bit, and affordable single-sensor APS-C and super 35 camcorders with conventional audio inputs (read: NOT DSLRs) seem to be creeping into view. However, for corporate/broadcast work, I like the ability to work very quickly with a very portable, fixed lens camera like the PX270 or the FDR-AX1.
 

Tim Kolb

New member
The selection of small form factor/small sensor cameras is pretty impressive these days.

Panasonic's tradeoff with this camera is that the ability to record an amazing array of formats (which helps a videographer/DP get hired as the diverse client roll call in the article indicates) comes at a price premium for a small sensor, small-frame HD camcorder purchase and the media necessary for "microP2" is also premium priced relative to even premium class SDXC type media.

If a videographer is going to make a living traveling and shooting corporate/broadcast work for hire, this camera has extraordinary specifications, particularly with the ability to shoot such a wide variety of "broadcast-approved" formats and it's travel-friendly form factor.

My travel/corporate camcorder remains the trusty Sony EX1, though the FDR-AX1 is starting to tempt me as the sensors are almost as large as the EX1, and as a 4K camcorder, is actually about the same price as the PX270 (or a bit less) though the internal formats are restricted to 50 Mbit/s XDcam422 for HD and 150 Mbit/s XAVC at UHD (~4K), and the Sony XQD media is priced similarly to microP2.

If you're a person who wants to do some expressive, creative "filmmaker" sort of projects (so few of us fit into one 'category' as it were), a larger sensor would help start to restrict the focal plane a bit, and affordable single-sensor APS-C and super 35 camcorders with conventional audio inputs (read: NOT DSLRs) seem to be creeping into view. However, for corporate/broadcast work, I like the ability to work very quickly with a very portable, fixed lens camera like the PX270 or the FDR-AX1.
 
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