4:3 stretch to 16:9

Isabella.B

New member
Hi,

I am applying University applications recently. Had coupe of questions kindly if you may acknowledge.

What is the professional and correct way to convert 4:3 shots into 16:9
(A) Without Pillar Bars full screen
(B) With Letter Boxing full screen

Regards
 

brickmadness

New member
If you're placing the 4:3 into 16:9 then you would be adding pillar boxing to the 4:3 image to increase the width to 16:9. Letterboxing is for going the reverse direction, which you would likely never do in 2021 because things are rarely displayed in 4:3.

In my opinion, it is never okay to stretch the image horizontally to fit the 16:9 screen. As a viewer, I will always seek an unstretched image if possible.
 

Isabella.B

New member
If you're placing the 4:3 into 16:9 then you would be adding pillar boxing to the 4:3 image to increase the width to 16:9. Letterboxing is for going the reverse direction, which you would likely never do in 2021 because things are rarely displayed in 4:3.

In my opinion, it is never okay to stretch the image horizontally to fit the 16:9 screen. As a viewer, I will always seek an unstretched image if possible.
So basicallly it is impossible and incorrect to show 4:3 clip strectched to 16:9 without pillar boxing?
 

jodymichelle

Senior Member
Staff member
In regard to converting 4:3 to 16:9 aspect ratio, sometimes people have to do it depending on the project and files they're working with. Sometimes we have to (I mean, we "get to") work with files we don't really want to work with. But then you get to ask yourself, "How can the thing that I least want, become valuable towards another goal?"

Back to your question. There's multiple ways to do things. I would probably "crop" or "crop/drag" until you don't see those black bars anymore. Or use Superview, non linear stretch tool, where the image stays normal in the middle, and stretches on the sides.

People need to edit all kinds of video shot on anything including iPhone, GoPro, drone cameras, etc...

Sometimes we might have to convert 4:3 to 16:9.




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