2 questions really

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sweetspicydiva

Guest
I have 2 questions really. I was suppose to write a script with someone else. They came up with half of the idea and I came up with the other half. However when it came time to write the script, they lost interest bc it's really not their thing. What I am wondering is, when I get it copyrighted, do I have to add their name or do I say "from ideas of ______and________?

My second question is about the script. I want to knoew how can I tell how long my script actually is time wise. I have dialogue but in some scenes there is no dialogue we just see the couple walking or enjoying themselves. It's like I am taking the audience through a 3 month love affair without seeing all the talking. Then later I want to show the main character going through these dramatic scenes. I mainly see the script as how I want to direct it, but how can I tell how long it is?
 
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Digigenic

Guest
Hey, Welcome to the forums

Well, I would agree with the approach of giving the other person half the credit for the idea, since that is what you say they’ve done. All that's assuming their ideas remain unchanged through the course of your writing the story, in which case, you'd still probably want to give them credit, so as to avoid any Tarantino/Avary like problems in the future.

As far as determining the length of your movie when translated from script to screen, it's generally 1 minute per page, meaning most scripts are only 120 pages long, because they rarely exceed 2 hours. However, for montage/convoluted time sequences without dialogue, you're looking at about half that time, give or take 10 to 15 seconds. So, if you have a typical 10 page script, you’re roughly looking at shooting a 10 minute movie. But, if you have a 10 page script and 4 of those pages have a montage/convoluted time sequence, then you’ll be trimming an estimated 2 to 3 minutes off your movie, leaving it around 7 minutes long. Make sense?
 
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sweetspicydiva

Guest
Digigenic said:
Hey, Welcome to the forums

Well, I would agree with the approach of giving the other person half the credit for the idea, since that is what you say they’ve done. All that's assuming their ideas remain unchanged through the course of your writing the story, in which case, you'd still probably want to give them credit, so as to avoid any Tarantino/Avary like problems in the future.
Thanks,

Now if I did get it copyrighted, they couldnt go and write another script could they? Since they did come up with half of the idea. I'm not saying they will try, but I want to see what all of my options are. I am probably going to use this movie for school, so I want to take any precautions I need.
 
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DerekEastham

Guest
Jacob's onto something there...

Really... you just have to credit the people correctly...

STORY BY: X & Y

SCREENPLAY BY: X (or Y)

but you'll also want to get them to sign something saying that this is all they want for credit... or work out some crediting issues with them before anything get's shot... otherwise it can be an issue later.
 
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