The Future is here...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a poll The Future is here...

    The Future is here...

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    Chris Cunningham
    0%
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    Spike Jonze
    0%
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    Paul Thomas Anderson
    0%
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    Sophia Coppola
    0%
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    Wes Anderson
    0%
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    Darren Aranovski
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    Guillermo Del Torro
    0%
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    M. Night Shyamalan
    0%
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    Peter Jackson
    0%
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    Quentin Tarantino
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    Which director do you think best represents the current and/or future trend in filmmaking? I've listed a series of directors for a poll to see who has their eye on these distant constellations.

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by MarkG
    Could you provide some examples of his 'unique style'? I've avoided 'Kill Bill', but I've yet to see anything unique about him... even his 'trademark' dialog from 'Pulp Fiction' appears to have been ripped off from 'Repo Man' (along with the aliens in the suitcase).
    Um... first off Mark... the "aliens in the suitcase" wasn't aliens in the suitcase... that was Mr. Wallace's Spirit in the suitcase. As for wether Quentin has been influenced by past cinema/television, obviously. As for wether or not he will mimic things he liked in his films, well, everyone who makes film does.

    However, if you want to know what's unique about Quentin... he's the only director making films today who can put together a film that seems to make no sense what-so-ever, yet by the end of the film (as long as we've been paying attention) the whole thing makes sense. Also, he is the only one to have such a variation in his visual style throughout one single film, and nothing feels out of place.

    It's not a fault to be someone who mimic's things that they liked in other films & television shows... Frankly, lots of Kill Bill is based on shows like "Kung Fu" & the like...

    It's when an audience can stop thinking "rip-off" and look beyond that to see what's really going on in the film is when they begin to know Tarantino & identify with his style/brand of filmmaking.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkG
    replied
    Quentin Tarantino has a unique style all his own.
    Could you provide some examples of his 'unique style'? I've avoided 'Kill Bill', but I've yet to see anything unique about him... even his 'trademark' dialog from 'Pulp Fiction' appears to have been ripped off from 'Repo Man' (along with the aliens in the suitcase).

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    LOL
    put myself on the list!... HA!
    I'm definetly not officially a Director yet... hahaha... and even then, I'd hardly call myself a director who embodies the future of production yet... i hardly have enough experience for that...

    Actually, I think your list is great... I just couldn't pick only 1 person... because some of them I feel are bound by the genre they direct in when it comes to a decision like that...

    LOL

    Anyhow, till later

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks for the input Derek, had there been no limitations, I'd have easily put 10 more directors on the poll. I'm always drawing inspiration from different sources, so the top 10 future directors I listed obviously aren't my exclusive sources of inspiration, I'll probably do another list at the end of the year.
    Feel free to post your top 10 future directors in a pole, I'd like to see who else we can squeeze into another one of these... 8)
    Oh, and try to refrain from putting yourself on the list alright... :wink:

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This is a great poll... however, I wont be able to vote in it.

    Many of these directors represent entirely different areas of cinema & filmmaking.

    Peter Jackson appears to embody the current & future trends of the major fantasy/sci-fi/epic brand of filmmaking. His revolutionary decision to do all three films at once... as well as his use of "biggatures" in lieu of entirely digital landscapes really helped sell the films in an age where the digital realm just isn't ready to recreate such an earthy landcscape in a fully realistic nature.

    Sophia Coppola is a brilliant storyteller, but her filmmaking style is very similar to the style of George Lucas. She's a very visual filmmaker. Her stories are told almost as silent films, everything can be understood from the pictures... the dialogue, while still an important part of the actors performances, is almost an afterthought. Were the film entirely silent, we would still know what was going on & how they moved from point a to point b. Her particular use of this visual style of filmmaking is something that is slowly moving into the drama/comedy genre... and perhaps this is where it will go for a time... but not likely a permanent trend. This will likely be more for the most artistic of filmmakers who approach the dramatic genre.

    Quentin Tarantino has a unique style all his own. While it is one that many people are trying to mimic... no-one else has quiet accomplished anything quite like what he has. His particular style has brought out an entirely new type of film... his style & approach has and will continue to become a regular part of cinema now and in the future.

    M. Night Shaymalan is his own kind of brilliant director. However, like Sophia, he has a lot in common (artistically) with another famous director, Hitchcock. In every generation we will have a new hitchcock... it's just destiny that someone is able to speak suspense & horror to the masses on such a sucessful scale... so really, there's nothign new except his own particular approach (which is something every director can claim). Don't get me wrong, I think he's brilliant... but his approach is nothing quite as extrordinary as some of the other filmmakers on the list.


    Ok... so that's my 4-cents of a blurb on this issue...
    I'm not as familiar with the other directors, though I do know who they are... I just don't know enough about them artistically to make an informed opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkG
    replied
    I don't know: I love Peter Jackson's movies, but I've never seen him as a great director. Great at doing impressive effects on low budgets (just look at 'Bad Taste', or the time-travel effects at the end of 'The Frighteners'), but IMHO he's more of a craftsman director than a genius.

    I love Quentin Tarantino. He has such an imagination on him that I love
    Huh? Pretty much everything good in any Tarantino movie I've seen is ripped off from other movies.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Company
    replied
    A director of the future?
    I had to go with Peter Jackson. Film is becoming more and more about who can do what on a computer, and Jackson is leading this field. Not that he doesnt have the ability to tell a great story too, but it was his CGI work on LOTR that got him my vote.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Yeah, I previously sited Gondry as a choice I'd like to have, but we're limited to posting only 10 choices in the polls.
    I do believe Michel and his brother "Oliver Twist" Gondry are having a major impact on the future of filmmaking.
    Another person that recently surfaced to my attention is Zach Braff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aparna
    replied
    Sorry, I skipped straight to reply after looking at the poll choices.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aparna
    replied
    You left out Michel Gondry. I think he represents the current trend better than any of the other choices.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    RESons RESons RESons...



    First and foremost, Chris Cunningham, Spike Jonze, Mike Mills (not listed), and Michel Gondry (not listed) are all very talented artists who are strikingly distinct and belong in a category all their own. Actually, they already do, “The Director’s Label”. Pick up any issue of RES Magazine and you're likely to see something of significance pertaining to any one of these three guys and their work. With Cunningham, Jonze, Mills, and Gondry, it's obvious that they aren't textbook filmmakers, they aren't playing it safe, and they for damn sure aren't sacrificing creativity for mass-market appeal, at least not yet. These guys are the real deal. It never fails for their work to yield phenomenal results, and that just amazes me.
    I strongly suggest researching and viewing some these directors’ works. The Director’s Label/Palm Pictures has a collector series of these directors’ earlier works. I urge you to at least look at those.
    Michel Gondry directed Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, so you can easily see that at the theater to get an idea of what I’m talking about. Pure genius man, there’s no other way to describe it.

    Now…Sophia Coppola… Seriously, do I have to explain? Searching the last name in IMDB alone practically gives you a list of individuals all throughout the industry to reveal a family hierarchy of directors, cinematographers, actors, producers, writers, etc. Not just by design, but also by her own virtue she’s proving to be a filmmaker for the future.

    On to Paul Thomas Anderson.
    Paul Thomas Anderson has a very definitive style of filmmaking, not to the “Hitchcock Emulator” degree of Shyamalan, but he's got an edge that makes his films very appealing. Magnolia was quite an achievement, and Punch Drunk Love was simply beautiful. Paul Thomas Anderson also seems to have the ability to attract all-star casts, which can sometimes be disastrous for other films, but for him, it's perfectly orchestrated. The kid's got talent.

    Wes Anderson (no relation to Paul Thomas Anderson) is without a doubt one of my favorite writers and directors.
    He often works with the same actors, and as a result, the actors are very natural in the characters they play, and they all undoubtedly give great performances. Wes Anderson’s films ritualistically employ a detached comedy tempo, which is hard to describe, but it’s humorous nonetheless. I strongly suggest seeing Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, and The Aquatic Life (to be released).

    Darren Aronovsky holds nothing back; giving you everything he’s got to keep your eyes from wondering away from the screen. Certain sequences within his films are edited very unpredictably and create a unique tempo that compliments the gritty emotional tones that make his films feel as raw as they do real.

    Guillermo Del Torro.
    If you haven’t been watching this guy, I suggest you start right away. Here is a director who simply knows how to make a damn good movie. His next major film to be released is Hellboy, an obvious Hollywood blockbuster. But, I also suggest you see The Devil’s Backbone, and Mimic.

    Hope that alleviates any of your concerns.

    Leave a comment:


  • Boone
    replied
    M. Night Shyamalan
    Peter Jackson
    Quentin Tarantino

    These three gentlemen know how to tell a story. I don't think they represent whatever it was you asking about. But in my opinion these three men are men to be studied because they know how to tell a good story. Thats what film making is all about, telling a good story. Unfortunately that sometimes goes unappreciated when box office sales come into play. I have so much to say I can't say it. lol. Oh who were those other people you listed I had to look them up on the IMDB and looking at the list of movies they represented why were they on the list
    :wink:

    Leave a comment:


  • solobird
    replied
    it said that Sofia Coppola mentioned and thanked Wong Kar-Wai because of his influence....

    Wong Kar-Wai is the director and producter of "Happy Together" , "in the mooon for love" ....
    he also wrote the screenplays.
    http://www.sensesofcinema.com/conten...s/02/wong.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    :? I'm not familiar with In The Mood For Love, was Lost in Translation a derivative of this movie?

    Leave a comment:

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