The Future is here...

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  • solobird
    replied
    Comparing "lost in translation" with "in the mood for love (2001) ", i like the originality of Kar-Wai Wong' work.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Sofia, Sofia…oh so real is my Sofia…

    Sofia, Sofia…oh so real is my Sofia…

    The tones and textures of artistry and honesty that compose Sofia Coppola’s films have seduced me to absolute infatuation.
    It's not uncommon to infatuate oneself with the aesthetic appeal of any film as of late, but the emotional depth found within Sofia Coppola’s films leaves you begging for connection. Connection with loved ones, connection with the world, connection with yourself.

    Sofia is the future…

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  • Aurora_Blacke
    replied
    The thing is, I think Sophia Coppola is the director of the future. Lost and Translation (even though I thought it was abit blan and confusing at times) was beautifully shot and had very good directing. My vote goes to Peter Jackson though. He worked his a$$ off on the LOTR movies and they came out wonderful. I think that people are going to notice Jackson a bit more now and appreciate the directing in, not only, the LOTR films but also in some of his zombe movies.

    I love Quentin Tarantino. He has such an imagination on him that I love but my vote is still for Peter Jackson.


    Aurora

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    So far, Tarantino appears to be in the lead...
    :shock:

    Anyone care to stand up for the other directors, surely someone out there supports Jonze, Paul or Wes Anderson, Coppola...
    I'm surprised Peter Jackson hasn't seen a single vote. Was LOTR not good enough?
    Guillermo Del Torro is right up there with Peter Jackson, he hasn't seen a vote either...

    Where's the love?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Cycles are meant to be broken…

    Cycles are meant to be broken…

    There's a noticeable difference that comes between Barney and many of the other up and coming filmmakers I've mentioned. Barney achieved most of his recognition through the "art" community as oppose to the film community. Although, his work can be analyzed on both fronts, which is why I guess he's such a fun figure to explore for such discussions in film. I also think that certain elements of his films give way to ridicule for being too "artistic", and failing to say what he really means. His work can be looked at like an experimental student film piece that just kept going and going and going for the sake of going and going and going.

    While I haven't been able to view all of his work, from what I have seen, he certainly shows promise in being able to do things that others wouldn't dream, or that others would dream, but wouldn't dare to put it on screen. For most people, it's the aesthetic appeal of his work that gets him all of the attention, primarily because the symbolic significance behind the visual is either hard to find, or thrown in your face and becomes more of a distraction. It's difficult for people to watch his work because he toys with you in that regard, drawing your eye to things that are pointless, when there's something else of significance you should be focused on. Is he doing it intentionally? Or does he not know how to give an audience what they want? Or does he really know what they want by giving them something they don't want so that they'll endlessly publicize his work and its lack of sense? This is when I really start to lose interest in it, because when I see the dog and pony show behind the dog and pony show, and I see how well connected the strings are for his work to gain instant recognition no matter what, I can’t help but think it’s all just a bunch of crap…even though the crap still looks good.

    On one hand, I think Barney's work is beautiful and insightful, on the other, I think he's just some guy whose status affords him certain advantages, like being able to do whatever he wants and calling it art. But then again, that can characterize quite a few artists out there.

    One thing is for certain, there's no such thing as "perfect art", or the "perfect artist", and even though his appeal is great, it doesn't constitute such a labeling. Perhaps he's an artist with perfect intent? But, I don't think he or his artwork are perfect by any stretch of the imagination.

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  • solobird
    replied
    what about Matthew Barney, cremaster?

    someone said that Matthew Barney's work is "a perfect art, then, for the turn of the millennium". do you agree?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I forgot to comment on Del Torro. Guillermo Del Torro, I believe he's done a very good job up to this point in his career, and I expect to see some really astonishing work coming from him.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    To each their own audience...and to each their own director

    To each their own audience...and to each their own director. I have respect for each of these directors, and I believe that each of them will always have an audience, assuming that they don’t have a sudden urge to add another installment to the Leprechaun series, or do a remake of Battlefield Earth, but who knows, maybe those films will be more appreciated over time?

    Anyhow, there are other directors I wanted to list, Mike Mills, Jonas Aukerland, Tarsem Singh, Matthew Barney, but I was limited to ten for the polls. I really like Paul Thomas Anderson though; the quality of his work is so precise, yet natural and beautiful. I almost drool with envy at how well crafted his films are…and how does he manage to get such a great cast for each of his movies?! It’s sickening! But I must admit, I have a fetish for Chris Cunningham's raw style.

    Cunningham’s (utilizing Glassworks Artists) unique usage of visual effects and editing makes you look at structure in a different way, the structure of nature, the structure of anatomy, the structure in everything. Many people criticize him for being a recluse and not being consistent, but I think if he were to continue advancing, audiences will never catch up to him. He has yet to do a feature of his own, but he's been involved as a special effects supervisor for high budget films since a young age, like 18 or something. I think his last major VFX contribution was to A.I., back when it was Stanley Kubrick's A.I., not Spielberg's.

    His music videos for Aphex Twin, Bjork, and Portishead gave him a lot of early notoriety, but it's difficult to truly measure the scope of his talent because he has yet to do a feature, and if he does, it’s unlikely that his erratic style and isolation will be acceptable within the mainstream. He's expected to do the Neuromancer, a really well known sci-fi novel. It's been said that if the Producers for the Neuromancer aren't able to get Cunningham to direct, they're going to get the Wachowski brothers. Hmmmmm...how's that for a compliment? “If we can't get this one guy to do it, we have to get two!”

    Cunningham is something else, but he's not for everyone.
    More than likely, we’ll see consistent, high quality work coming from Peter Jackson (he’s a given), Sophia Coppola, Paul Thomas Anderson, Darren Aranovsky, Wes Anderson, Spike Jonze, M. Night Shyamalan and...mmmm, alright...Quentin Tarantino.

    I know that there are plenty of other up and coming directors who weren't mentioned within this list, so if you have any other suggestions please feel free...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Aronofsky

    This is something I have thought of before. Aronofsky has an interesting style. I am only familiar with Pi. That film set a new standard for editing and the potentials of film. If I were to choose anyone, it would be Aronofsky. Though I am not familiar with all of those directors.

    The only work of Christopher Nolan I have seen is Following but from what I have read, he seems unique enough to be apart of your list.

    Who do you say?

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