The Future is here...

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  • #16
    Sorry, I skipped straight to reply after looking at the poll choices.
    I'm into filmmaking because I can't deal with reality.

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    • #17
      Yeah, I previously sited Gondry as a choice I'd like to have, but we're limited to posting only 10 choices in the polls.
      I do believe Michel and his brother "Oliver Twist" Gondry are having a major impact on the future of filmmaking.
      Another person that recently surfaced to my attention is Zach Braff.

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      • #18
        A director of the future?
        I had to go with Peter Jackson. Film is becoming more and more about who can do what on a computer, and Jackson is leading this field. Not that he doesnt have the ability to tell a great story too, but it was his CGI work on LOTR that got him my vote.

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        • #19
          I don't know: I love Peter Jackson's movies, but I've never seen him as a great director. Great at doing impressive effects on low budgets (just look at 'Bad Taste', or the time-travel effects at the end of 'The Frighteners'), but IMHO he's more of a craftsman director than a genius.

          I love Quentin Tarantino. He has such an imagination on him that I love
          Huh? Pretty much everything good in any Tarantino movie I've seen is ripped off from other movies.
          Sony Z1, P4-3.06/2GB RAM/2500GB IDE/SATA. Avid Media Composer, Lightwave, Eyeon Fusion 6.

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          • #20
            This is a great poll... however, I wont be able to vote in it.

            Many of these directors represent entirely different areas of cinema & filmmaking.

            Peter Jackson appears to embody the current & future trends of the major fantasy/sci-fi/epic brand of filmmaking. His revolutionary decision to do all three films at once... as well as his use of "biggatures" in lieu of entirely digital landscapes really helped sell the films in an age where the digital realm just isn't ready to recreate such an earthy landcscape in a fully realistic nature.

            Sophia Coppola is a brilliant storyteller, but her filmmaking style is very similar to the style of George Lucas. She's a very visual filmmaker. Her stories are told almost as silent films, everything can be understood from the pictures... the dialogue, while still an important part of the actors performances, is almost an afterthought. Were the film entirely silent, we would still know what was going on & how they moved from point a to point b. Her particular use of this visual style of filmmaking is something that is slowly moving into the drama/comedy genre... and perhaps this is where it will go for a time... but not likely a permanent trend. This will likely be more for the most artistic of filmmakers who approach the dramatic genre.

            Quentin Tarantino has a unique style all his own. While it is one that many people are trying to mimic... no-one else has quiet accomplished anything quite like what he has. His particular style has brought out an entirely new type of film... his style & approach has and will continue to become a regular part of cinema now and in the future.

            M. Night Shaymalan is his own kind of brilliant director. However, like Sophia, he has a lot in common (artistically) with another famous director, Hitchcock. In every generation we will have a new hitchcock... it's just destiny that someone is able to speak suspense & horror to the masses on such a sucessful scale... so really, there's nothign new except his own particular approach (which is something every director can claim). Don't get me wrong, I think he's brilliant... but his approach is nothing quite as extrordinary as some of the other filmmakers on the list.


            Ok... so that's my 4-cents of a blurb on this issue...
            I'm not as familiar with the other directors, though I do know who they are... I just don't know enough about them artistically to make an informed opinion.

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            • #21
              Thanks for the input Derek, had there been no limitations, I'd have easily put 10 more directors on the poll. I'm always drawing inspiration from different sources, so the top 10 future directors I listed obviously aren't my exclusive sources of inspiration, I'll probably do another list at the end of the year.
              Feel free to post your top 10 future directors in a pole, I'd like to see who else we can squeeze into another one of these... 8)
              Oh, and try to refrain from putting yourself on the list alright... :wink:

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              • #22
                LOL
                put myself on the list!... HA!
                I'm definetly not officially a Director yet... hahaha... and even then, I'd hardly call myself a director who embodies the future of production yet... i hardly have enough experience for that...

                Actually, I think your list is great... I just couldn't pick only 1 person... because some of them I feel are bound by the genre they direct in when it comes to a decision like that...

                LOL

                Anyhow, till later

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                • #23
                  Quentin Tarantino has a unique style all his own.
                  Could you provide some examples of his 'unique style'? I've avoided 'Kill Bill', but I've yet to see anything unique about him... even his 'trademark' dialog from 'Pulp Fiction' appears to have been ripped off from 'Repo Man' (along with the aliens in the suitcase).
                  Sony Z1, P4-3.06/2GB RAM/2500GB IDE/SATA. Avid Media Composer, Lightwave, Eyeon Fusion 6.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by MarkG
                    Could you provide some examples of his 'unique style'? I've avoided 'Kill Bill', but I've yet to see anything unique about him... even his 'trademark' dialog from 'Pulp Fiction' appears to have been ripped off from 'Repo Man' (along with the aliens in the suitcase).
                    Um... first off Mark... the "aliens in the suitcase" wasn't aliens in the suitcase... that was Mr. Wallace's Spirit in the suitcase. As for wether Quentin has been influenced by past cinema/television, obviously. As for wether or not he will mimic things he liked in his films, well, everyone who makes film does.

                    However, if you want to know what's unique about Quentin... he's the only director making films today who can put together a film that seems to make no sense what-so-ever, yet by the end of the film (as long as we've been paying attention) the whole thing makes sense. Also, he is the only one to have such a variation in his visual style throughout one single film, and nothing feels out of place.

                    It's not a fault to be someone who mimic's things that they liked in other films & television shows... Frankly, lots of Kill Bill is based on shows like "Kung Fu" & the like...

                    It's when an audience can stop thinking "rip-off" and look beyond that to see what's really going on in the film is when they begin to know Tarantino & identify with his style/brand of filmmaking.

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