ISO

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ISO

    Is there a way to determine the ISO of a digital video camera? I'm almost certain the ISO cannot be found in the manual. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong places. I'm very curious. Like say, the pd-170. Thanks.
    don't forget the story.

  • #2
    Easy way: Turn on the zebras (at 100 IRE), point the camera at an evenly lit white surface, and iris down until the zebras just disappear on the white surface. Then, meter it, and adjust the iso on your meter until the aperture on the meter reading matches the one set on the camera.

    Accurate way: hook the camera up to a waveform monitor, and point it at an evenly lit white card. Iris down until the highlights hit 100 IRE on the waveform, and then meter until your meter reading matches your iris on the camera.

    Really Easy way (especially if oyu don't have a meter): Look on google, someone has probably figured it out already, but sometimes you get different numbers. See what most people seem to agree on.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by element80
      Easy way: Turn on the zebras (at 100 IRE), point the camera at an evenly lit white surface, and iris down until the zebras just disappear on the white surface. Then, meter it, and adjust the iso on your meter until the aperture on the meter reading matches the one set on the camera.

      Accurate way: hook the camera up to a waveform monitor, and point it at an evenly lit white card. Iris down until the highlights hit 100 IRE on the waveform, and then meter until your meter reading matches your iris on the camera.

      Really Easy way (especially if oyu don't have a meter): Look on google, someone has probably figured it out already, but sometimes you get different numbers. See what most people seem to agree on.
      This was really informative! I have the same question

      It would be nice if someone had already metered the most common cameras, like the PD150, GL1, XL1 etc!

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, using just under clipping as your reference for ISO is not really a great way to do this.

        You are much better off using a gray card and adjusting your stop until the card looks correct and then continue as was said above. Or set the zebras to 75 and find a 'normal' white skin tone to use as reference.

        The best way is definitely with a waveform and a chip chart.

        Comment

        Working...
        X