Filmmakers Forums Community Spotlight: Asael, Composer

So for me it all started in Cuba when I was roughly about 7-8 years old. I started taking piano lessons later taking it more seriously and becoming more classically inclined. Once I moved to the US, my music perspective shifted, and I started getting more into jazz and movie soundtracks. I got involved with ensembles on my local town and after that started composing piano songs on my own. I ended up making a piano/ electronic album in which later got nominated and won best electronic album at a local award ceremony in my town. I also produced local hip hop artists in the area later having them get nominated for best hip hop album of the year.

How did composing music become a career for you? What’s your musical background?

Asael: Composing became a career right as soon as I started high school. I’ve always been fascinated with film, so ever since then, it’s been my passion. My musical background started with classical music, but as the years went, I got more into jazz. So, basically, a good mix of both.

What technologies, software and gear, as well as instruments do you use to compose your music?

Asael: So, currently, I use and experiment with different software. For example, I use FL Studio, and then, sometimes, I like to go basic with platforms such as Soundtrap or GarageBand. As for instruments and all sound effects, I do them myself. I currently own a Lynx electric guitar, an 88 Casio keyboard, two acoustic Albanez guitars, a blue Yamaha bass, and a small midi keyboard.

What are some of your thoughts on the relationship between music and moving images?

Asael: I believe that without the theory of sound in film, movies will not have a great or interesting value in our modern age. Music has the power to showcase any type of emotion in the great screen, and it’s a fascinating gem that we have in our disposal today.

Can you share a quick tip for young filmmakers on collaborating with composers?

Asael: Vision on a film can always be interpreted in music. The connection that those have are critical to any piece of filmmaking. So, whenever you’re writing a script or working on shots for a movie, you have to think on the mood or character that shot or scene is going to be saying and how it will translate into moving pictures with sound.Filmmakers Forums Community Spotlight: Asael, Composer

Join the Filmmakers Forums Community Online >>

 

Responses

Related Articles You May Like